The 10 Best Hotels in Prague, Czechia

The 10 best hotels in Prague, Czehia, chosen by experts of The Telegraph, including luxury hotels, boutique hotels, budget hotels and Prague hotel deals.

Le Palais Art Hotel Prague

Location on the map >>>

Le Palais Art Hotel Prague

Interiors by Veronika Jurkowitsch somehow blend Baroque with modernity, with as many cosy reading nooks as chandeliers while the terrace, mosaic-tiled floors and vaulted ceilings are thoroughly decadent. The two dining rooms of the in-house restaurant Le Papillon regularly feature in Czech lifestyle glossies.

Interiors by Veronika Jurkowitsch somehow blend Baroque with modernity, with as many cosy reading nooks as chandeliers while the terrace, mosaic-tiled floors and vaulted ceilings are thoroughly decadent.

Rooms from €183 per night

Boscolo Prague, Autograph Collection

Location on the map >>>

Boscolo Prague

With its opulent public spaces and exquisitely designed rooms, Prague’s Boscolo hotel oozes Italian-style panache. With in-house facilities including a Roman spa with 20-metre pool, a cigar bar set in one of the oldest cognac vaults in Europe and a couple of great restaurants, you’ll feel like royalty.

Housed inside a neoclassical palazzo, the hotel makes a big impression on the inside too: think a huge, high-ceilinged foyer, grand staircases and original chandeliers. There’s also more ornate stucco, polished marble and fine woods than you can shake a Venetian artisan at, but also lots of modern touches and sleek restaurant décor.

Rooms from €424

Augustine, a Luxury Collection Hotel, Prague

Location on the map >>>

Augustine

Arguably one of Prague’s most impressive accommodation options, the five-star Augustine merges a historical location with some seriously sharp 20th-century design. Amenities include a comprehensive spa, quite magnificent cocktail bar and courtyard restaurant with terrace and glass ceiling.

Rooms from €347 per night

The hotel is set inside a maze-like combination of buildings that once formed part of the 13th-century St Thomas Church and Monastery; in fact, a working community of Augustinian friars still live on the grounds. The merging with Cubist-inspired interiors by Olga Polizzi feels unique and inspired. Modernist furnishings and artworks pepper the public areas and rooms, tastefully combined with nods to the monastery’s history, such as religious statues and symbols subtly sewn into curtains and cushions. Service is impeccable throughout.

Alchymist Prague Castle Suites

Location on the map >>>

Alchymist Prague Castle Suites

Tucked away on a cobbled corner just uphill from the Czech parliament, itself settled into the 18th-century Wallenstein Palace, this eight-room hotel is a significant step up from any opulence a mere Czech senator might hope for. The amenities verge on over-the-top.

With foundations that date to its 15th-century origins as a Hussite gentry mansion and liberal use of gold gilt trim and Bohemian crystal chandeliers, the Alchymist Prague Caste Suites would make a perfect hideout for a visiting rock star (and it presumably does). The cinematic oak stairs, restored as per the designs of Art Nouveau architect Josef Fanta, the pre-WWI owner, speak to the building’s remarkable history. Having been made over twice, thanks to Renaissance-era fires in the narrow, once jumbled district, the villa has settled well into its Baroque form, replete with grand staircases, sculpted ceiling panels and glorious arches. Old Prague houses have names that predate the Habsburg-era numerical system and the Alchymist retains its original moniker, At the Turk’s Head, likely a holdover from 16th-century Ottoman battles. Clearly, in a city filled with characterful stays, none trumps this grandiose, yet strangely ingratiating venture.

Golden Well Hotel

Location on the map >>>

Golden Well Hotel

The feel of a royal retreat runs throughout these cosy yet classic 19 guest rooms, located just below Prague Castle in the Malá Strana district. Make sure to enjoy seafood and Bohemian game dishes at the hotel’s top-floor restaurant, which boasts magnificent views and welcomes both hotel guests and Prague’s elite.

The Golden Well hotel, as its name derives from the translation of U Zlaté Studné, still features the aforementioned waterhole, along with wood-panelled interiors, deco settees, and traces of the building’s storied past as the home of court astronomer Tycho Brahe.

Rooms from €288 per night

Hotel U Prince

Location on the map >>>” target = “_blank”>Location on the map >>>

Hotel U Prince

This historic all-rounder ticks several boxes, from heritage-listed interiors, comfortable and romantically attired rooms and apartments, a couple of restaurants and a lively cocktail bar. Best of all it’s located slap-bang on Old Town Square, with the city literally at your feet.

Originally constructed in the 12th-century, the hotel building is acutely historical even by Prague’s standards – the labyrinthine interior is actually a World Heritage listed site. In aesthetic terms, that means exposed beams and stone masonry throughout, as well as parquet floors, ceilings featuring restored frescoes as well as a wealth of antique furnishing; the overall feel is of an incredibly elegant renaissance home.

Alchymist Grand Hotel and Spa

Location on the map >>>” target = “_blank”>Location on the map >>>

Alchymist Grand Hotel and Spa

With parts of the stunning Baroque villa dating back to medieval Prague — the stone-walled underground passages that now form a transcendent spa space — the hotel could well be a museum but for its warmth, sunny terrace, posh dining room, cheerful chocolatier and youthful, international staff.

Known in the late 16th century as Dům u Ježíška, this lustrous collection of rococco curves and chandelier-lit sitting rooms still shows off original features from its Baroque past. The rear areas facing the courtyard and the sandstone passages leading through its spas date back to the fortification of the Malá Strana district in 1257. Its restoration nearly a decade ago was one of the most thorough and thoughtfully done in the old heart of Prague, with Italian art maven Giorgio Bonelli salvaging what was once a hulking ruin with remarkable panache. He’s since filled every free space within its glazed amber walls with antique sedans, Bohemian crystal, leather-backed tomes, princely writing desks and decorative nautilus shells. The entry courtyard’s scrafittoed walls and Grecian fountains set the tone.

Rooms from €277 per night

Four Seasons Hotel Prague

Location on the map >>>

Four Seasons Hotel Prague

One of the city’s plushest and best-located hotels, it comprises several separate structures from different eras, lending plenty of character to the interior and rooms. Décor and furnishings are a reliable mix of classic and modern, service is impeccable throughout and you’re just a gargoyle-lob from Charles Bridge.

Pierre-Yves Rochon re-modelled the hotel’s rooms, suites and lobby in 2012, updating Frank Nicholson’s original design. The classic Four Seasons feel – timeless and upscale with rich woods, marble floors and a particularly vast and ornate lobby – remains, though, complemented by lovely flourishes like decorative cornices, tromp l’oeil and crafted stucco. The restaurant and bar design, by EDG studio, is much bolder, creating a nice mix of classic and contemporary.

Rooms from €552 per night

Fusion Hotel, Prague

Location on the map >>>

Fusion Hotel Prague

Positioned somewhere between a backpacker and a design hotel, this hip and multi-faceted hotel complex – part of the Leonardo Hotels portfolio – close to Wenceslas Square features a range of individually decorated rooms, a revolving bar, several in-house eateries, and a games room with in-built Skype booth.

From the in-your-face reception area (neon signs, faux handwriting on the black walls, an Instagram ‘Wall of Fame’) to the rooms and public areas, the interiors here are bold, contemporary, and occasionally a bit eye-rolling. Installations, artworks and design elements come mostly from local Czech artists, while the concrete floors in the rooms and corridors lend the place a coolly industrial feel.

Rooms from €78 per night

Aria Hotel Prague

Location on the map >>>

Aria Hotel Prague

Located on the same street as the US embassy, you can expect the same opulence at the Aria Hotel — lush textiles, Baroque gardens — as well as a musical theme which includes a staff musicologist, screening rooms and bedrooms dedicated to musicians, in which you’ll find iPads loaded with house selections.

Inside, designer Rocco Magnoli’s lush textiles, colours and classic hardwood furnishings flow like serenades to style, while the Baroque garden is straight out of Shakespeare.

Rooms from €322 per night

The Dancing House, Prague, Czechia

The Dancing House, Prague, Czechia

The Dancing House (Czech: Tančící dům), or Fred and Ginger, is the nickname given to the Nationale-Nederlanden building on the Rašínovo nábřeží (Rašín Embankment) in Prague, Czech Republic. It was designed by the Croatian-Czech architect Vlado Milunić in cooperation with Canadian-American architect Frank Gehry on a vacant riverfront plot. The building was designed in 1992 and completed in 1996.

The very non-traditional design was controversial at the time because the house stands out among the Baroque, Gothic and Art Nouveau buildings for which Prague is famous, and in the opinion of some it does not accord well with these architectural styles. The then Czech president, Václav Havel, who lived for decades next to the site, had avidly supported this project, hoping that the building would become a center of cultural activity.

Gehry originally named the house Fred and Ginger (after the famous dancers Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers – the house resembles a pair of dancers)[2] but this nickname is now rarely used; moreover, Gehry himself was later “afraid to import American Hollywood kitsch to Prague”, and thus discarded his own idea.

(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)